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4/1/07 - To Hell and Back
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Pilot



Joined: 31 Mar 2007
Posts: 31
Location: Universidad (NYC)

PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2007 7:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

CAPITAL is the the city/town/place, and the Upper Case letter.
CAPITOL is the building.

Quote:
Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1) - Cite This Source
Cap·i·tol /ˈkæpɪtl/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[kap-i-tl] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun
1. the building in Washington, D.C., used by the Congress of the U.S. for its sessions.
2. (often lowercase) a building occupied by a state legislature.
3. the ancient temple of Jupiter at Rome, on the Capitoline.
4. the Capitoline.
[Origin: 1690–1700, Americanism; < L capitōlium temple of Jupiter on Capitoline hill, Rome, taken to be a derivative of caput head; r. ME capitolie < ONF]

—Usage note See capital1.
Dictionary.com Unabridged (v 1.1)
Based on the Random House Unabridged Dictionary, © Random House, Inc. 2006.
American Heritage Dictionary - Cite This Source
cap·i·tol (kāp'ĭ-tl) Pronunciation Key
n.

1. A building or complex of buildings in which a state legislature meets.
2. Capitol The building in Washington, D.C., where the Congress of the United States meets. See Usage Note at capital1.



[Middle English Capitol, Jupiter's temple in Rome, from Old French capitole, from Latin Capitōlium, after Capitōlīnus, Capitoline, the hill on which Jupiter's temple stood; perhaps akin to caput, capit-, head; see capital1.]



Quote:
cap·i·tal1 /ˈkæpɪtl/ Pronunciation Key - Show Spelled Pronunciation[kap-i-tl] Pronunciation Key - Show IPA Pronunciation
–noun
1. the city or town that is the official seat of government in a country, state, etc.: Tokyo is the capital of Japan.
2. a city regarded as being of special eminence in some field of activity: New York is the dance capital of the world.
3. capital letter.
4. the wealth, whether in money or property, owned or employed in business by an individual, firm, corporation, etc.
5. an accumulated stock of such wealth.
6. any form of wealth employed or capable of being employed in the production of more wealth.
7. Accounting.
a. assets remaining after deduction of liabilities; the net worth of a business.
b. the ownership interest in a business.
8. any source of profit, advantage, power, etc.; asset: His indefatigable drive is his greatest capital.
9. capitalists as a group or class (distinguished from labor): High taxation has reduced the spending power of capital.
–adjective
10. pertaining to financial capital: capital stock.
11. principal; highly important: This guide offers suggestions of capital interest to travelers.
12. chief, esp. as being the official seat of government of a country, state, etc.: the capital city of France.
13. excellent or first-rate: a capital hotel; a capital fellow.
14. capital letter.
15. involving the loss of life: capital punishment.
16. punishable by death: a capital crime; a capital offender.
17. fatal; extremely serious: a capital error.

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filecore



Joined: 27 Oct 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 5:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Sadly I suspect that this, rather like semicolons and other punctuation, will never be fully understood by the masses. And let's not even get into 'explanation marks' :-(
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YenTheFirst



Joined: 18 Feb 2007
Posts: 2620
Location: Slightly less than crazy.

PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

we have explanation marks?

wow.
I thought we only had exclamation marks!
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filecore



Joined: 27 Oct 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Trust me on this; I'm my spare time, I'm an English language teacher and I run my own proofreading/editing business. Things like this bug the hell out of me (my personal pet hate is apostrophe misuse), but 'explanation marks' is a common one. The inability to differentiate between irony and sarcasm is another (but I blame Alanis Morisette for that one).
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bun bun
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:07 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

filecore wrote:
I'm my spare time

This is somehow seriously profound.
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filecore



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PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:10 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hmm, that should have been 'in'. I don't apply my professional skills to dodgy forums ;-)

Anyway, I can't spend all day just trawling (and, occasionally, trolling) forums, can I? Having said that, it's a non-teaching day today, so even though I have to work, I can do it while slobbing around at home in my pyjamas. There are benefits to freelance work (not many, I'll grant you that, but some).

Incidentally it's a little past 9am, locally.


Last edited by filecore on Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:11 am; edited 1 time in total
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filecore



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PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:13 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Well I'm beginning to get a little bit lost...
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bun bun
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:14 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

filecore wrote:
Hmm, that should have been 'in'. I don't apply my professional skills to dodgy forums Wink

Anyway, I can't spend all day just trawling (and, occasionally, trolling) forums, can I? Having said that, it's a non-teaching day today, so even though I have to work, I can do it while slobbing around at home in my pyjamas. There are benefits to freelance work (not many, I'll grant you that, but some).

Incidentally it's a little past 9am, locally.

Whoa now, sparky. Adding a winky face does not give you leave to call us dodgy. Even though Benny makes us pretty dodgy. And Snorri can whip up a damned good leer.

I'm confused as to why you gave us the local time. I'd certainly be interested in learning about these "time zones" I keep hearing so much about; must be exciting, do tell me, I'm all ears.
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Arc Tempest



Joined: 28 Jan 2007
Posts: 4892
Location: Oregon

PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:17 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wait a second, you mean to tell me we aren't dodgy? I thought that was part of the charm...
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filecore



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PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

It is part of the charm. It'd be pretty dull here otherwise.
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YenTheFirst



Joined: 18 Feb 2007
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Location: Slightly less than crazy.

PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:36 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

filecore wrote:
but 'explanation marks' is a common one. The inability to differentiate between irony and sarcasm is another (but I blame Alanis Morisette for that one).


Am i missing a joke here? what are "explanation marks"?

imagine my head.
now imagine the whooshing sound as a thousand jokes go over it.
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filecore



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PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 6:42 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

No, you were right. There is no such thing as 'explanation marks', but a lot of people suffer from an apparent inability to say/type 'exclamation marks' and appear to quite sincerely believe that it's 'explanation marks'. Be glad if you've never come across the phenomenon.
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Twister87
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PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 7:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Personally I never have. Most common ones I see and make me cringe are things like "your dead" and "i could of done it" and "there over their, by the wall" etc etc etc

And I like dodgy. *dodges around a bit*
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filecore



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PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 7:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Yep, I well understand that. Compound broken grammar with the fact that there are UK/US differences (some things that I would mark a student down for in a test are perfectly acceptable in English variants) - one particular source of argument among the teachers is "at the weekend"/"on the weekend" (UK/US). It's fun to add in Australians and South Africans, because you never know whose version of English they'll agree on at any given moment. It's all such a mess.

But seriously: apostrophes for contraction (it's, we're, I'm) and possession (John's, the dog's). Never for plurals (CD's, pizza's). That's basically all the rules there are - how hard can it be?
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MellowFish



Joined: 30 Sep 2006
Posts: 755
Location: The Train to Gloryland

PostPosted: Wed Apr 04, 2007 8:45 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

filecore wrote:
Yep, I well understand that. Compound broken grammar with the fact that there are UK/US differences (some things that I would mark a student down for in a test are perfectly acceptable in English variants) - one particular source of argument among the teachers is "at the weekend"/"on the weekend" (UK/US). It's fun to add in Australians and South Africans, because you never know whose version of English they'll agree on at any given moment. It's all such a mess.

But seriously: apostrophes for contraction (it's, we're, I'm) and possession (John's, the dog's). Never for plurals (CD's, pizza's). That's basically all the rules there are - how hard can it be?


Ok, I may be stupid here but is it "the dog is in it's house" or "the dog is in its house" (no apostrophe) I have had people who know grammar better than me tell me it was no apostrophe, but I am not sure I believe them because it's possesion.
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