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Iran is exploding.
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Sam the Eagle



Joined: 02 Oct 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 29, 2009 12:13 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's very worth resurrecting, the country is under pressure again.

The way Pasdarans and other paramilitary forces were abusing their powers, and their inmates, leading to some death, had the street in uproar so much that they had to free about a hundred of prisoners made back after election, go see BBC for linky.

Add, there is some infighting between Amhdinejab and Khamenei, cf. the spat about vice-prez and the last two ministers thrown off.

This is still far from being finished. Woe to any foreign gov. who tries to meddle with the place right now though.
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Mizike



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 30, 2009 2:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Insert flashing Drudge light here

The LA Times wrote:
Reporting from Tehran and Beirut -- Thousands and possibly tens of thousands of mourners, many of them black-clad young women carrying roses, overwhelmed security forces today at Tehran's largest cemetery to gather around the grave of Neda Agha-Soltan, the young woman whose videotaped shooting at a June 20 demonstration stunned the world.

Mourners in a long procession converged on the burial site, kicking up clouds of dust as they walked. "Death to the dictator," they chanted. "Neda is not dead. This government is dead."

Uniformed security forces initially clashed violently today with some of the mourners, supporters and leaders of the opposition, who were there to protest and grieve for those killed in recent unrest. Unsuccessful presidential candidates Mir-Hossein Mousavi and Mehdi Karroubi attempted to attend the graveside ceremony marking the religiously significant 40th day since the death of Agha-Soltan and others killed in the fighting.

"Oh, Hossein! Mir-Hossein," the mourners chanted in support of him.

According to one witness, who asked not to be identified for fear of reprisal, Mousavi stepped out of his car only to be surrounded by police, who forced him back into his vehicle and out of the cemetery.

At first, mourners were confronted by security forces, who struck some with batons and made arrests in an attempt to bar them from gathering at Tehran's Behesht Zahra cemetery, the country's largest. The tree-lined streets leading to the graves of Agha-Soltan and others were blocked by riot police, the witness said.

The witness said protesters identified and violently confronted several plainclothes Basiji militiamen.

"Police, police, support us," the crowd chanted. "God is great!"

But as people poured out of the nearby subway station and taxis along the highway, security forces retreated. One witness said police released detainees and began cooperating with the mourners, directing them to Section 257 of the cemetery, where Agha-Soltan and others were buried.

The request for a permit to hold a ceremony in the city's Grand Mossala mosque later today was denied, but protesters have said they will try to come together near the site of the mosque anyway and march along nearby streets if they are prevented from entering the site.


There's a good deal more at the link.
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Sam the Eagle



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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 5:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ahmadinejad is now vetted in, to the surprise of nobody.

What is more interesting is the trial, pick your reference, which is supposed once more to make people believe elections were all fair and proper... After all the recounting etc.., one would think there is little need for yet another public display.

The more they push it, the more they make it look like the whole thing is a sham.
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Him



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PostPosted: Wed Aug 05, 2009 3:22 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Another division:
"Ahmadinejad’s first choice of Mashaie as vice-president provoked deep turmoil. For nearly a week, Ahmadinejad hesitated before accepting the demand of Ayatollah Khamenei, the Supreme Leader, that Mashaie should not be vice-president. Eventually, Ahmadinejad was publicly forced to back down, although he then appointed Mashaie as his personal chief of staff. This may be one factor in the apparent awkwardness between Khamenei and Ahmadinejad at the Supreme Leader’s endorsement ceremony.

The Mashaie issue provoked a clash in Ahmadinejad’s outgoing cabinet which resulted in the sacking of the Intelligence Minister. The whole Mashaie incident serves as an illustration of the deep tensions even amongst the “winning group” of the ruling circles."

Repression will not end crisis
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Sam the Eagle



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PostPosted: Sun Aug 23, 2009 7:23 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

This horse isn't dead yet :

It's a man's world

Quote:
Conservative clerics in Iran have criticised a proposal by re-elected President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to include three women in his new cabinet.


At least it's good to know who are those in need of a trepanation.

And, for that regime, this does makes some sense :

Iran's defence minister-designate is on an Interpol "wanted" list over the 1994 bombing of a Jewish centre in Argentina, the agency has confirmed.

This isn't the best year for diplomatic immunity. Can't wait for this guy to meet Sudan's Pres, it should be interesting.
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Mizike



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PostPosted: Mon Dec 28, 2009 1:03 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

First, some important background info:
Ashura was December 27th. Near as I can tell, it memorializes a tyrant killing a righteous figure of Shi'a Islam.

This year, Ashura coincided with memorials recognizing the recent death of Ali Montazeri, a cleric who was once in line to succeed Khomeini as the supreme leader of Iran, but was "disinherited" due to his disagreements with Khomeini and his more liberal views (e.g. women are people too).

So the last 36 hours or so in Iran have, predictably, been tumultuous. Much of the same things have happened as did back in June. Protesters take the streets, armed guards confront them and beat them, and the cycle repeats. It sounds like the nephew of Mir-Hossein Mousavi was killed during Ashura. Assassinated, it seems.

Quote:
Unlike the other protesters reported killed on Sunday, Ali Moussavi appears to have been assassinated in a political gesture aimed at his uncle, according to Mohsen Makhmalbaf, an opposition figure based in Paris with close ties to the Moussavi family.

Mr. Moussavi was first run over by a sport utility vehicle outside his home, Mr. Makhmalbaf wrote on his Web site. Five men then emerged from the car, and one of them shot Mr. Moussavi. Government officials took the body late Sunday and warned the family not to hold a funeral, Mr. Makhmalbaf wrote.


This is an event that captured my attention back in June and I find everything about it fascinating. I cannot recommend highly enough looking throught the photographs from the recent protests posted here. Just yesterday, I had a nice, discussion about politics and our current political climate with a friend - how people in the US talk about fascism so readily. Halfway across the world, thousands of otherwise unremarkable people are rising up, taking a stand, and sometimes dying.


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Sam the Eagle



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

It's being 6 month in a row now that protest carried on. Each and every public manifestation were used as rallying points to protest against the regime.

The report about Moussavi's nephew death aren't clear yet. Cf. this article.

The regime tries to depict these protest as foreign fueled, it may be true now even if it didn't started as such, but given the amount of protesters I have some doubts on the issue: The sheer amount of persons demonstrating is far too great and too spread all over the cities.

I do concur with this other piece

Quote:
"The demands have gone way beyond cancellation of elections, and now people are demanding fundamental change in the system"


But I fear it'll take more protest before a change of governemt's attitude is to be seen. That, and the very best thing one can do to help them is to do nothing, even if it chafes.
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Darqcyde



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PostPosted: Tue Dec 29, 2009 8:11 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To a certain degree internal strife needs to be allowed to be resolved internally.
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dazedb42



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PostPosted: Wed Dec 30, 2009 1:39 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

...like Afghanistan?
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Mizike



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 2:26 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Tomorrow, February 11th, is the next day that major scuffles are likely to arise. Here's the pregame report.
Quote:
[ analysis ] Feb. 11, 2010, may stand as a decisive day for the regime. Its leaders hope to prove to domestic and international audiences that they are in full control and that the protest movement which arose following last June's election is a spent force. In order to do that, they must make sure that unlike Ashura, as well as other occasions, the protesters cannot congregate in large numbers and upstage the regime's well-choreographed processions. In light of such a production, all the protest movement must achieve to avoid appearing vanquished is to show even a modest display of vigor and vitality.

Background

Ashura (December 27) proved to be a pivotal day all around. First, it forced other governments (beginning with the Obama Administration) to re-evaluate their views of the Green Movement as a democratic but ineffectual force. Second, it allowed the hardliners in Iran to claim that the Green Wave movement presented a mortal threat to the entire regime. Prior to that, some moderate conservatives and some important traditionalist high clerics in Qom were leaning toward accepting the need for some version of a grand compromise--especially evident after the huge funeral march for the late Ayatollah Hossein Ali Montazeri right in the heart of the holy city.

However, the anti-regime militancy of the protesters on Ashura changed those sentiments, at least temporarily. The centrist forces were either terrified or forced into adopting strong positions against the protesters. Taking advantage of a sudden opportunity, the hard-line forces who had now been badly divided or demoralized hastily mounted a large counter-demonstration on December 30, in which calls were made for the immediate arrest of the opposition leaders and the execution of those earlier detained. What made this development particularly ominous was the fact that information seeping out pointed to the creation of death squads by forces specifically tasked with the elimination of opposition leaders and activists. This would have taken the form of "independent" and "spontaneous" lynch mobs which would have carried out their ignominious task claiming to represent ordinary Muslims outraged by the despoiling of Islamic values.

On January 9, Ayatollah Khamenei famously made a stand against this development, probably under pressure from Qom's grand ayatollahs. "Any roguish activity helps the enemy," he told a visiting crowd from the holy city. "The involvement of those without legal status or responsibility only compounds the problem." This meant that the stalemate continued unabated.

What is at stake

The main objective of the regime is to announce that (in continuation of the Dec 30 gathering) on Feb 11 the people of Iran by referendum have cast their verdict against the protest movement and in favor of the current regime. Once this occurs, authorities would move to arrest Mousavi (assuming that he hasn't caved in by that time on his own accord) and forcefully clamp down on the whole Green Movement.

For this all to be successful, they must (a) contain the protesters on the 11th, (b) fill the surrounding streets with their own people, and (c) make things appear as calm and orderly to the state media and ideally to the international media (they have allowed some networks and journalists entry to Iran for Thursday).


There's much more at the link.
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kame



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 2:25 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Ahmadinawalawalabingbang announced that Iran has enriched Uranium.

Let the "Oh God they'll kill us all!" cries start now.
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ShadowCell



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PostPosted: Thu Feb 11, 2010 3:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

kame wrote:
Ahmadinawalawalabingbang announced that Iran has enriched Uranium.

Let the "Oh God they'll kill us all!" cries start now.


lol
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Darqcyde



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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2010 6:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I necro this thread because Imma thinkin' that the aforementioned events here are what lead to this newest Iranian crackdown on education:

Iran restricts social sciences seen as 'Western'

by NASSER KARIMI, Associated Press Writer – Sun Oct 24, 10:02 am ET TEHRAN, Iran

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20101024/ap_on_re_mi_ea/ml_iran_university_restrictions

Quote:
Iran has imposed new restrictions on 12 university social sciences deemed to be based on Western schools of thought and therefore incompatible with Islamic teachings, state radio reported Sunday.
The list includes law, philosophy, management, psychology, political science and the two subjects that appear to cause the most concern among Iran's conservative leadership — women's studies and human rights.
"The content of the current courses in the 12 subjects is not in harmony with religious fundamentals and they are based on Western schools of thought," senior education official Abolfazl Hassani told state radio.
Hassani said the restrictions prevent universities from opening new departments in these subjects. The government will also revise the content of current programs by up to 70 percent over the next few years, he said.
The decision is seen as a response to concerns expressed last year by Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, who said the subjects could lead to religious doubts. Khamenei, who has final say on all state matters in Iran, urged officials to take altering the curriculum into "serious consideration."
Some two million out of 3.5 million Iranian university students are studying social sciences and humanities, according to government statistics.
University students have played a key role in opposition protests in Iran, especially after the country's disputed presidential election last year, which opposition activists say hardline President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad won through massive fraud.
Since Ahmadinejad came to power in 2005, he has pushed a revival of the fundamentalist goals pursued in the 1980s under the late Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, father of the 1979 Islamic revolution in Iran.
In 2006, dozens of liberal university professors and teachers were sent into retirement, drawing strong protests from students. Liberal and secular professors teach at universities around the country, but they are a minority. Most are politically passive and do not identify with either the hard-liners or the liberal camp.
In 1980, Iran closed down universities for two years to get rid of partisan students of political groups, mostly armed leftist ones.

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nathan



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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2010 5:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

My old sociology prof was from Tehran. Good thing he got while the getting was good!
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mouse



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PostPosted: Mon Oct 25, 2010 5:56 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

hmmm...their list includes law, management and political science. that suggests some nasty long-term consequences for the iranian people. revising the law curriculum suggests they don't want anyone with the knowledge to criticize whatever laws or judicial ruling the powers-that-be want to put in (that rather goes along with shutting down study on human rights). political science, i would think, might impact their ability to deal with other countries long-term, although i suspect it's more to keep anyone from getting any ideas about changing their own system. management, though, that seems odd. i'm not seeing a political/religious context for that, but i should think it would have long-term impacts on things like running businesses, government departments, other things that affect revenue and expenditures.
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