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Toss that bagged spinach!
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mouse



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 6:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

well, the frozen stuff was still available...
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Snorri



Joined: 09 Jul 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 6:30 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

rm wrote:
I like my eggs florentine.


I like my eggs on someone elses plate.
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Major Tom



Joined: 09 Jul 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 8:44 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

mouse wrote:
well, the frozen stuff was still available...


yeah...because we all know how freezing will kill bacteria...
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mouse



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
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PostPosted: Wed Sep 20, 2006 9:08 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

well, besides, it's grown-up spinach, not that wimpy baby spinach they put in bags.
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Alla



Joined: 24 Sep 2006
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2006 1:31 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

i work as a prep cook in a applebees in canada. And all of our spinach comes from the states. i started laughing when they told us not use the spinach because it had e. coli. Not because people were sick, but more as in a surpised laugh. It worked out well for me, i had less salads to make. Very Happy
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bun bun
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PostPosted: Sun Sep 24, 2006 1:33 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

so wait. we can't eat spinach, which has only had some very rare e coli outbreaks, but it's ok to eat mac donalds, which has a horrible e coli outbreak every few months or so?

er...

yay, meatpacking industry dollars, woooooo!
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Major Tom



Joined: 09 Jul 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 1:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

new york times readers wrote:
To the Editor:

Re “Leafy Green Sewage” (Op-Ed, Sept. 21):

Nina Plank speaks to a symptom of our addiction to industrial agriculture and our insistence on year-round availability of all foods.

We have not only shortchanged the lives and diets of the animals, but have also created a system that allows consumers to be vegetarians and still be poisoned by meat.

Traceability is critical, and the best way to ensure it is not through more government regulation and big business, but through stronger relationships with the individual farmers who grow our food.

Todd Wickstrom
Ann Arbor, Mich., Sept. 21, 2006
The writer is a co-founder of Heritage Foods USA.



To the Editor:

The spinach from Natural Selection Foods that has been implicated in the E. coli outbreak was produced to supply the organic foods industry, whose standards demand the use of supposedly safe natural fertilizers like sterilized cow manure. But the use of that manure — as opposed to the use of presumably less safe manmade fertilizers — could well be the source of the current outbreak.

In fact, from a fertilizing perspective, there are no chemical differences between the two fertilizers, but the sterilized manure has been implicated in far more disease outbreaks than manmade fertilizers.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States and its British counterpart have both gathered statistics suggesting that there is a substantially greater likelihood of contracting E. coli-based and similar illnesses from organic produce than from conventionally grown produce.

As a consequence, any attempt to ameliorate disease risk from produce must investigate farming practices like those employed by organic farmers.

Elliot Entis
Waltham, Mass., Sept. 21, 2006
The writer is a co-founder and the chief executive of Aqua Bounty, a biotechnology company.



To the Editor:

The difficulty of locating the source of the spinach tainted with E. coli shows the need for a federal regulation requiring that companies that package this product include a code name or number for the raw spinach supplier.

This code could be included in the place on the bag where the shelf date or origination date is printed.

In this way, the source of the contamination could be readily identified, and consumers could be notified immediately of the bag code so they would know which bags to avoid.

This same problem has occurred before, but maybe next time we can solve it.

Robert Ackerberg
Massapequa, N.Y., Sept. 21, 2006



To the Editor:

The national spinach panic is but one example of the downside of the industrialization of food production and distribution, and another reason to look into alternatives based on local production and distribution — and supporting your local small farmers’ market.

Tom Miller
Oakland, Calif., Sept. 21, 2006

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WheelsOfConfusion



Joined: 09 Jul 2006
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PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 1:09 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

To the Editor:

I never cared bout no eecola. I yam what I yam. Auck-uk-uk-uk.
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E-boy



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 1552
Location: Virginia (Much barfiness)

PostPosted: Mon Sep 25, 2006 4:23 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

interesting side note being as we're talking about contaminated spinach....

Scientists (see SCIAM this month's issue), have managed to engineer a strain of harmless e-coli that actually absorb toxins from other bacteria. In mice it makes for a very effective treatment for food poisoning, as this bacteria can absorb most if not all of the toxins released from the nasty bacteria. It's not perfect, of course, but it's a damn good treatment option if it ever makes it to human use because it has no effect on resident gut flora (the way anti-biotics do). Thus making treatment of food poisioning possible without creating potentially anti-biotic resistant strains of bacteria.
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