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Signing the cartoons
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bur



Joined: 13 Jul 2006
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 12:48 am    Post subject: Signing the cartoons Reply with quote

I only recently noticed that almost all cartoons have a little sign in some panel, looking like two kanji (I think the first one's "right"), maybe meaning Tasuya Ishida? A couple of weeks ago the sign wasn't used frequently anymore and now it seems most cartoons are just signed "T". But I still wonder if the kanji were Tat's name (probably) or something else (could be). Does anyone know what these kanji really read? Mostly they're drawn rather sloppy and hard to identify but perhaps some chinese/japanese speakers are reading here and can help.

Just choose any of the earlier cartoons from 2000 or so, the sign was rather clearly written then.
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Dusty



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 650

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 5:03 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

point us to an example of this.
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Natashabi



Joined: 09 Jul 2006
Posts: 390
Location: Tejas

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 5:06 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



See the Kanji in the lower right of the last cell?



Here the T is in the lower left of the last cell.
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bun bun
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PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 9:18 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow I <3 learning Japanese.

Yeah I reco'nized 'em straight away. The first one is ishi, which has the readings seki, shaki or koku as well. This reading means "stone".

The second is the kanji for "rice paddy" or "field", readings den or ta.

Because of the placement of the tongue at the end of saying "ishi", the first sound in "ta" developed into somewhat of an alveolar flap, resulting in the voicing of the "t" to make it a "d".

So his last name means "stony field". Which makes some sense, I guess.

Edit: here's the kanji blown up for y'all. I searched a kanji website for big, prettily written ones.



P.S. these are basic kanji, so they actually look somewhat like their meanings. The first is supposed to look like a plough hitting a rock under the earth, and the second is an arial view of a rice paddy.

Sowwy to Tat if this is wrong/offensive or being wayyy too nosy. (I'll take it down if you like!) But his family were most likely rice farmers at some point way back, who were named for taming particularly rocky/difficult rice fields, thus most likely from a mountainous region of Japan originally. (Though if I remember rightly, Ishida is a really common family name.)
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Halen



Joined: 09 Jul 2006
Posts: 1883
Location: England

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 7:26 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

You are cool Smile
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Laughterheals



Joined: 14 Jul 2006
Posts: 141
Location: The OC

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 7:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Neat! Never noticed that...
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thewaitersitsondown



Joined: 09 Jul 2006
Posts: 2673
Location: The walrus was Paul

PostPosted: Tue Jul 18, 2006 8:14 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Halen wrote:
You are cool Smile
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bur



Joined: 13 Jul 2006
Posts: 14

PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 12:25 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Thanks for the explanation bun bun! Smile I thought the first kanji was "right", it looks quite similar, if I remember correct.

I learned japanese for 2 years at the "adult education center" (don't know if that's the proper american word for the german Volkshochschule) but as it was only once a week (thus 150 hours all in all) we didn't learm much kanji but focused on learning the basics using hiragana/katakana.

In september course III will begin and maybe next year I'll visit Japan... Very Happy My brother starts japanology (is it called like that in the US?) this year at University so I think he'll be able to help me out if needed. Unfortunately as the Euro/Yen exchange rate is rather bad, expenses on holiday in Japan are quite high, so we probably only go there for about 2 weeks while I think a month would be better with such a foreign country.

Anyway ...

Sorry for this long off-topic post, but I'm already quite excited and looking forward for that trip since forever. Smile
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bun bun
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 7:35 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm coming back to live here the year after next; Vassar has a year-abroad program.

And by the way, spot on, kinda. This is the kanji for right, pronounced "migi", "u" or "yu", depending on whether it stands "alone" (which nothing ever really does in Japanese, but...er...it's complicated *sigh*), or is part of a larger "word":

And this is the kanji for stone again.

I guessed that it would be "ishi", quickly written so that it looks like "migi", because of the way the kanji was placed in the comic; that's a typical place to put a signature in Japanese art, all the way back to ink paintings and woodblock. It could have only been one of those two, really. Of course it was "ishi", because that's the start of his name, for one, and two, "da" is really clearly recognisable.
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maniac_wolfman



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 628

PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 11:56 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

bun bun wrote:
*Bun Bun being knowledgeable/awesome


*swoon

You have earned three out of four <3's

<3 <3 <3
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bun bun
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 12:15 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

maniac_wolfman wrote:
bun bun wrote:
*Bun Bun being knowledgeable/awesome


*swoon

You have earned three out of four <3's

<3 <3 <3

aw.
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bun bun
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 12:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

thewaitersitsondown wrote:
Halen wrote:
You are cool Smile

aw again.
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Fhqwhgads



Joined: 11 Jul 2006
Posts: 1337
Location: sfcaus

PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 12:42 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Shocked yeah, tritto. or quitto, I lose track. Razz I'm sorry you have to go though! Have a reasonably tolerable flight OK? Wink
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Lemontree



Joined: 10 Jul 2006
Posts: 3298

PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 12:46 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

bun bun wrote:
Wow I <3 learning Japanese.

Yeah I reco'nized 'em straight away. The first one is ishi, which has the readings seki, shaki or koku as well. This reading means "stone".

Edit: here's the kanji blown up for y'all. I searched a kanji website for big, prettily written ones.


P.S. these are basic kanji, so they actually look somewhat like their meanings. The first is supposed to look like a plough hitting a rock under the earth, and the second is an arial view of a rice paddy.


I recognized the second kanji from my Japanese lessons.. but the first one's fairly new to me.. but honestly by looking at it, I had no clue how the symbol could represent a stone until you explained it. Thats just awesome! I mean they didn't draw a stone as a square.. because they were mostly farmers, and what would matter to them, is having to get around such obstacles of cultivation.

So yes, more <3s to you. Btw where in Japan are you staying, if you don't mind me asking? I have a good friend who lived in Osaka for a year, a year ago, and is going back to an outskirt of Tokyo in September after taking up a job with a company based out of Toronto (I've forgotten the name just now) to teach English as a second language after work/school. And she's hoping to apply to JET in a year.
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bun bun
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PostPosted: Wed Jul 19, 2006 1:21 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Lemontree wrote:
bun bun wrote:
Wow I <3 learning Japanese.

Yeah I reco'nized 'em straight away. The first one is ishi, which has the readings seki, shaki or koku as well. This reading means "stone".

Edit: here's the kanji blown up for y'all. I searched a kanji website for big, prettily written ones.


P.S. these are basic kanji, so they actually look somewhat like their meanings. The first is supposed to look like a plough hitting a rock under the earth, and the second is an arial view of a rice paddy.


I recognized the second kanji from my Japanese lessons.. but the first one's fairly new to me.. but honestly by looking at it, I had no clue how the symbol could represent a stone until you explained it. Thats just awesome! I mean they didn't draw a stone as a square.. because they were mostly farmers, and what would matter to them, is having to get around such obstacles of cultivation.

So yes, more <3s to you. Btw where in Japan are you staying, if you don't mind me asking? I have a good friend who lived in Osaka for a year, a year ago, and is going back to an outskirt of Tokyo in September after taking up a job with a company based out of Toronto (I've forgotten the name just now) to teach English as a second language after work/school. And she's hoping to apply to JET in a year.

At the moment I'm staying in Ooyama, just near Ooyama Station, off of "Happy Fun Road" (I am not making this up), north Tokyo, close-ish to Ikebukuro. I leave on Sunday, however. Big elephant tears *sobsob*.

Don't forget, kanji were stolen wholesale from the Chinese. The readings have been totally altered, so it is spoken differently, plus Japanese is an inflective language, you know all this because you're taking Japanese. Anyways, don't forget that the origins of kanji sometimes make no sense when viewed in a Japanese context, because the pictoral origins are Chinese...

Also, all kanji are somewhat angular, which is why things like stones come out as square. There is one radical that's an exception, and it's a biotch to draw right, when you're using it in a sentence. Here it is, in the kanji for "to commute", or "to attend school" with the readings "kayo(u)" or "tsuu":

And again in the kanji for "week", pronounced "shuu" (this one only has one reading, as far as I know):

Even this evil little squiggle (EVIL. eeeevil. ESPECIALLY when writing "two weeks (duration)" in kanji. I ALWAYS mess it up, and growl annoyedly, and have to start over.) is made somewhat angular for printed kanji. These pictures are actually halfway between handwriting and typewritten.
The reason for this is easy discernability. Once you start learning a lot of kanji, you'll find that having to draw a lot of really tiny straight lines, hooks and squares is a lot easier than having to draw a neat circle or curve in such rushed/cramped conditions. The reason everything is squared off is purely utilitarian, so that when you get to kanji with 20 strokes, it won't look like scribbles. It's easier to link lines together when they're straight, too.

EDIT: Also, they had a problem drawing a stone as just a plain square because that kanji was taken. Voila: "kuchi","kou", "ku", or "mouth".
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